Macron in Eastern Europe: the posted workers directive is “a treason to European values”

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Image courtesy of the Express UK

 

In 1996, the European Union adopted a new directive loosening the free movements of workers within its borders. It made an exception to a 1980 law stating that workers are protected by the law of the state in which they work, thus facilitating social and financial dumpling: employers can use cheaper labor than it is usually available at their site of production when workers come from countries with lower payroll expenses or firms with headquarters in Eastern European countries can send workers to the more prosperous side of Europe while still paying the same amount of payroll taxes. As a result, the number of Eastern European workers migrating towards the Western part of the Union amounted to 166,000 last year.

While this directive might be seen as useful for workers coming from the poorest countries in Europe, French President Emmanuel Macron, currently on a diplomatic tour in Eastern Europe, declared in Vienna that the 1996 measure is  “a treason to the European values.” German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Austrian Chancellor Christian Kern stood by his side in his attempts to convince Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, Bulgaria, and Romania to drop the directive in view of the upcoming European Union texts reforms in October.

Macron’s propositions against the posted workers directive are to reduce the allowed period of time given to workers abroad from 24 to 12 months, equalize wages between posted and local workers, and accentuate the regulations and controls to eradicate the many “mailbox” companies, which are firms falsely based in Eastern European countries for lower tax expenses.


As the biggest providers of posted workers, Poland and Hungary are major opponents of the reform. On Friday, during a speech in the Bulgarian city of Varna, Macron bluntly denounced Poland’s refusal to tighten the directive’s regulations, which he illustrated as a “new mistake by Warsaw which already put itself on the fringes of the European Union regarding numerous matters.” The President also declared that “Poland is not even close to what Europe is aiming at, by deciding to go against Europe’s interests.”
Macron alluded to the recent jurisdiction passed in Poland that has been staunchly criticized by other European countries for being allegedly discriminatory, as it would allow the Polish Minister of Justice to implement different retirement ages for male and female judges as well as extending the judges’ mandates beyond retirement age.

Warsaw’s answer to the French President was scathing and possibly created Macron’s first diplomatic incident within the European Union.

“Perhaps those arrogant declarations are due to a lack of political experience, which I comprehend, but I am waiting for him to rapidly catch up with shortcomings and be more reserved in the future,” declared the Poland’s Prime Minister, Beata Szydlo. “I advise Mr. President to focus on his country’s current affairs; he would then maybe rise to Poland’s economic results and security levels.”

As a reply, the Elysee declared that “the President’s critique was not aiming at the European Eastern countries but was already formulated by the Commission as non-respect of the European principles.”

Malaysia launched contest for best “gay prevention” videos

 

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Image courtesy of “RT.com”

-Article by Maneesha Khalae

Last June, the Malaysian government announced a competition on the health ministry’s official website where participants submit videos dedicated to teenagers embracing “gender confusion.” The winner will receive up to 4282 Malaysian ringgit ($1000) when the competition ends in August. The overarching topic of the contest being “Value Yourself: Healthy Lifestyle Practice,” the government-selected themes are focused on prevention, control, and the issues and consequences of homosexuality.

Despite the outcry from local LGBTQ activists such as Nisha Ayub and Pang Khee Teik who denounce the contest as alienating and dangerous for an already vulnerable demographic, the Malaysian deputy director general of health, Lokman Hakim Sulaiman, declares it is aimed to “tap the creativity” of teenagers’ minds about sexual and reproductive health. However, while homosexuality prevention is one of Malaysia’s main social concerns, instructive sexual education for teenagers is still missing. According to a 2011 report from the Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, 65% of teenagers in rural areas of the country, such as Kelantan and Terengganu, claimed that their main source of sexual information was friends.

This competition announcement comes when conditions for LGBTQ Malaysians have been worsening due to the rapid rise of social and religious conservatism, which marked a shift from the more liberal attitudes in the 1970s and 1980s. It is important to note that in addition to being socially taboo, homosexuality remains forbidden and punishable by law.

A few months ago, Malaysia gained a certain notoriety for intending to ban “Beauty and The Beast” for a purportedly “gay moment” between the characters Le Fou and Gaston. The film was eventually allowed to be screened in full without any cuts. However, the screening of a 2011 Vietnamese film, ‘Lost in Paradise,’ depicting a romantic relationship between two men, was canceled at a local Penang Performing Arts Center after State Religious Affairs Committee Chairman Datuk Abdul Malik Abul Kassim sent an official letter to the organizers regarding its “sensitive” content. The Chairman of Muslim Network of Penang, Hafiz Nordin, quipped: “If they really are Malaysians, they should know that such movies should not be screened for the public. This can be construed by some as a way of promoting homosexuality in our country.”

Malaysia remains a state which criminalizes homosexuality on many levels, even going so far as to organize seminars, in 2012, for parents on how to “spot” indicators of possible homosexual tendencies in their children. The government-established signs of potential homosexuality were intrinsically based on clichés: men wearing tight clothes and carrying large handbags, and women spending large amounts of time in the company of other women.

Edouard Philippe’s government validated by National Assembly’s “trust vote”

 

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French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe during the “trust vote” at the National Assembly (image courtesy of BFM.TV)

 

-Article by Alice Ferré

On Tuesday, the French National Assembly held the traditional “trust vote” to express their stance on the legitimacy of the current administration. Edouard Philippe’s government won a green light from a majority of 370 deputies against 67. Such approval rate had not been seen since 1959, along with a high abstention rate of 129 deputies.

The Prime Minister is now held responsible before the Assembly and able to oversee the legislative branch  to pass laws under rare and extreme circumstances.

 

French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe announced new government after ongoing corruption investigation leaves doubt on ministers’ integrity

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French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe (image courtesy of Ouest-France)

 

-Article by Alice Ferré

On June 9, a preliminary investigation was launched to enlighten an alleged fund embezzlement by major figures of the centrist party MoDem and extreme-right party National Front.

France’s new government was affected by the investigation as many ministers, also members of the MoDem party, resigned this week. Those concerned are the Minister of the Armies Sylvie Goulard, the Minister of European Affairs Marielle de Sarnez, and the Minister of Justice and MoDem party leader Francois Bayrou, who had viscerally supported President Macron during his campaign. The Minister of Territorial Cohesion Richard Ferrand also resigned after rumors of a real estate affair that would have benefited his wife in 2011.

The information that put oil on fire was disclosed by the famous weekly satirical newspaper “Le Canard Enchaine,” the same publication that unveiled the Fillon scandal and caused the rightist candidate his presidential bid last January.

Although the government was supposed to be redesigned after the legislative election results on Sunday- as the tradition wants it –  to reinforce the executive power by limiting ideological cohabitation between the legislative and the executive branch, the reform took an unexpected turn.

“Le Canard” accused Francois Bayrou, as the same time as the now-former Minister of Justice was working on “a moralization of the political life” law project to fight corruption and facilitate transparency in politics, and other MoDem European deputies of using the European Parliament’s funds to pay their personal aides, thus creating fake jobs. On June 8, a former MoDem employee, who wished to remain anonymous, revealed to the highest Paris court, that he had been remunerated as a parliamentary aide to MoDem-affiliated deputy Jean-Luc Bennhamias in 2011 while his contract postulated he was simply working for the party.

This method of falsely recruiting party members as parliamentary aides increased over the years in the MoDem, according to France Info. Each European deputy or national deputies and senators have at their disposal a 24.000 euro-credits to pay their assistants, would they be either in Brussels, Strasbourg, or other circumscriptions. They are not allowed to employ aides that already have a position in their party, as it not only creates illegal mandate accumulations but also fake jobs. This fund embezzlement means the party leader and members don’t spend much of the party’s money.

Mr. Bayrou told the French newspaper “Le Monde” that his decision was “a personal choice” that will “simplify” the current investigation. Echoing Mr. Bayrou, Mrs. Goulard, who quit the day before, said her move was out of “good faith,” regarding the ongoing investigation planning over her party.

Edouard Philippe’s second government remains in line with President Macron’s promises of parity and involvement of civil personalities and new faces. Mrs. Nicole Belloubet, who now replaces Mr. Bayrou as the Minister of Justice, was a former law teacher; Mrs. Genevieve Darrieussecq, 61, a doctor and the mayor of a small town in West Southern France, was named as Minister of the Armies.

“La République en marche” wins the most parliamentary seats as France faces a historically low voter turnout

-Article by Alice Ferré

On Sunday, the presidential party “La République en marche,” in coalition with the MoDem, won 361 over 577 seats in the French National Assembly during the second round of the legislative election, achieving the most outstanding majority since 1958.

 

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Graph showing the proportion of parliamentary seats held by each party and their allies (courtesy of BFM.TV.fr)

 


Although Marine Le Pen’s National Front made it to the second tour of the presidential election in May, it seems to have lost its short-term glory, winning only eight seats in the Parliament. Major parties, including the Republicans, the Socialist Party, and France Insoumise, created coalitions with ideology-sharing, smaller political groups to maximize their number of seats – the National Front was the only party standing alone. The Republicans won 126 seats, the Socialist Party 46, and the France Insoumise 26.

French voters excelled in their voting abstention for this election: the first round was saluted by a 51,2% abstention rate which rose to 56,6% this Sunday. This result still questions the French’s acceptance towards President Macron even after a month and a half in office.

 

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Map of the abstention rate by districts (courtesy of LeMonde.fr)

 

 

 

“La République en marche” on its way to parliamentary majority

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-Article by Alice Ferré

It was a validation vote for “La République en marche” on Sunday’s first round of the French legislative elections. The newly founded presidential party (created by President Macron himself only two years ago) won most seats in the National Assembly with 32,32% of the vote – or between 390 and 430 seats over 577. The right party The Republicans and allies arrived second with 21,56% while the National Front and the “France Insoumise” arrived third and fourth with respectively 13,74% and 13,2%. The four parties will face voters once again this Sunday in a second round; “La République en marche” is expected to stay ahead with at least more than 400 seats over 577, one of the strongest parliamentary majority since 1958. Mainly, “La République en marche” would rule over 72 to 78,9% of the National Assembly, a positive sign for President Macron.

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Graph determining parliamentary seats after the first round on Sunday (courtesy of LeMonde.fr). 

However, the President’s main opposition may not remain in the party lines but on the street; this election’s abstention rate was 51.2% of the 47 million voters.

After the final results this Sunday, deputies will have to wait until June, 27 to become officially part of the National Assembly, and next week will announce the beginning of the parliamentary group forming. Parties like the National Front or the Socialist Party, owing little seats, opposing the majority party, and lacking important allies will encounter difficulties forming their group, which requires 15 deputies. The Republicans are likely to be divided over joining “La République en marche” as many of them had endorsed centrist President Macron during his campaign over the last months. Each group presents one of their members as their leaders, and the president of one of the political majority groups will be chosen to be the National Assembly Chairman.

The final step towards the officialization of this new assembly will be on July, 4. Prime Minister Edouard Philippe will give a speech presenting his cabinet’s general political line and vowing it will be politically held responsible in front of the assembly, thus respecting the deputies’ representative power and voices.
This speech will be followed by the traditional “trust vote” introducing each new government; deputies will express their opinions on the legitimacy of the current administration. If the Prime Minister gets the majority vote, which is likely to happen this time, he is able to oversee the legislative branch under extreme and rare conditions to pass laws. A cabinet can be rejected only if the majority vote disavows it.

A guide to the French Parliamentary elections

 

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(Image courtesy of bassussarry.fr)

 

-Article by Alice Ferré

The French parliamentary election will take place on Sundays June 11 and 18, a few weeks away from the presidential election that flung France’s formerly unknown political prodigy fighting doublespeak, Emmanuel Macron, on the political scene.  Similarly to the United States, the key movement for the French executive power’s party “La République en Marche” (previously “En Marche!”) – or other concurring parties – is to win as many ideological allies in Parliament as possible. For this reason, this legislative election is often referred as “the third round.”

577 deputies will be elected in the 557 implicitly delimited districts (the “circonscriptions”). The dividing up of those districts is based on population, one district having 120,000 inhabitants.

Candidates must be French citizens and at least 18 of age. However, they are not required to live in the district they will represent, for the national, not local, status of their position; although the tradition wants the deputy to have a permanent residence in their district, “parachuting” is accepted. Political experience is also optional.

The electoral mechanism is identical to the presidential elections’: it is an uninominal and traditional 50%-plus-one-vote system. A second round is scheduled if no candidate is elected by a majority during the first one. Eligibility for the second round means to have had at least 12,5% of the votes.

According to the French newspaper Le Monde, there would be approximately 14 candidates per district or a total of 7882 candidates. Most of them are already politically active and known actors of the political scene, like Jean-Luc Mélenchon, the extreme-left of “La France Insoumise” who unsuccessfully ran for president this year and is now a parliamentary candidate in France’s second biggest city, Marseille.

A political party has to win 289 seats for legislative control, as this number represents the absolute majority at the National Assembly.

So far, the brand new presidential party seems to win by a landslide, regardless of its candidates’ political experience. Amongst the important political personalities of the different shades of the political spectrum running for parliamentary seats are Jean-Luc Mélenchon in Marseille, former President Hollande’s Minister of Housing and Territorial Equality Cécile Duflot and Minister of Education and Research Najat Vallaud-Belkacem (first woman to be appointed to this ministry) in the Parisian districts, Marine Le Pen in one of the Northen districts of Nord-Pas-de-Calais.

Jean-Paul Bret, the Socialist mayor of the city of Villeurbanne, told French radio broadcast France Info that “even if En Marche! announced a potato sack as one of their candidates, they would have a high chance to win.” The Socialist Party, amongst other ones, is indeed doomed after Hollande’s unpopular term and catastrophic presidential election results.

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Polls by L’Internaute.com (June 10) 

According to today’s polls by L’Internaute.com’s polling institute, “La République en Marche” would score 30%, the right party “Les Républicains” 23%, and the National Front 18% (meaning they have significantly lost popularity since the presidential elections). It is a vote for legitimacy and approval for the presidential party.
“France Insoumise” and the Socialist party would respectively score 11% and 9% of the votes.